Markdown Test

The HTML <hr> element is for creating a “thematic break” between paragraph-level elements. In Markdown, you can create a <hr> with any of the following:

  • ___: three consecutive underscores
  • ---: three consecutive dashes
  • ***: three consecutive asterisks

 The rendered output looks like this:




For emphasizing a snippet of text with a heavier font-weight.

The following snippet of text is rendered as bold text.

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**rendered as bold text**
__rendered as bold text__

 The rendered output looks like this:

rendered as bold text rendered as bold text

For emphasizing a snippet of text with italics.

The following snippet of text is rendered as italicized text.

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*rendered as italicized text*
_rendered as italicized text_

 The rendered output looks like this:

rendered as italicized text rendered as italicized text

In [GFM]^(GitHub flavored Markdown) you can do strikethroughs.

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~~Strike through this text.~~

 The rendered output looks like this:

Strike through this text.

Bold, italics, and strikethrough can be used in combination.

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***bold and italics***
~~**strikethrough and bold**~~
~~*strikethrough and italics*~~
~~***bold, italics and strikethrough***~~

 The rendered output looks like this:

bold and italics

strikethrough and bold

strikethrough and italics

bold, italics and strikethrough

For quoting blocks of content from another source within your document.

Add > before any text you want to quote:

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> **Hugo** is the fastest tool of its kind. At <1 ms per page, the average site builds in less than a second.

 The rendered output looks like this:

Hugo is the fastest tool of its kind. At <1 ms per page, the average site builds in less than a second.

Blockquotes can also be nested:

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> Hugo's shortcodes are Markdown's hidden superpower.
>> We love the beautiful simplicity of markdown’s syntax, but there are times when we want more flexibility. Hugo shortcodes allow for both beauty and flexibility.

 The rendered output looks like this:

Hugo’s shortcodes are Markdown’s hidden superpower.

We love the beautiful simplicity of markdown’s syntax, but there are times when we want more flexibility. Hugo shortcodes allow for both beauty and flexibility.

A list of items in which the order of the items does not explicitly matter.

You may use any of the following symbols to denote bullets for each list item:

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* valid bullet
- valid bullet
+ valid bullet

For example:

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* Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet
* Consectetur adipiscing elit
* Integer molestie lorem at massa
* Facilisis in pretium nisl aliquet
* Nulla volutpat aliquam velit
  * Phasellus iaculis neque
  * Purus sodales ultricies
  * Vestibulum laoreet porttitor sem
  * Ac tristique libero volutpat at
* Faucibus porta lacus fringilla vel
* Aenean sit amet erat nunc
* Eget porttitor lorem

 The rendered output looks like this:

  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet
  • Consectetur adipiscing elit
  • Integer molestie lorem at massa
  • Facilisis in pretium nisl aliquet
  • Nulla volutpat aliquam velit
    • Phasellus iaculis neque
    • Purus sodales ultricies
    • Vestibulum laoreet porttitor sem
    • Ac tristique libero volutpat at
  • Faucibus porta lacus fringilla vel
  • Aenean sit amet erat nunc
  • Eget porttitor lorem

A list of items in which the order of items does explicitly matter.

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1. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet
2. Consectetur adipiscing elit
3. Integer molestie lorem at massa
4. Facilisis in pretium nisl aliquet
5. Nulla volutpat aliquam velit
6. Faucibus porta lacus fringilla vel
7. Aenean sit amet erat nunc
8. Eget porttitor lorem

 The rendered output looks like this:

  1. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet
  2. Consectetur adipiscing elit
  3. Integer molestie lorem at massa
  4. Facilisis in pretium nisl aliquet
  5. Nulla volutpat aliquam velit
  6. Faucibus porta lacus fringilla vel
  7. Aenean sit amet erat nunc
  8. Eget porttitor lorem
Tip

If you just use 1. for each number, Markdown will automatically number each item. For example:

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1. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet
1. Consectetur adipiscing elit
1. Integer molestie lorem at massa
1. Facilisis in pretium nisl aliquet
1. Nulla volutpat aliquam velit
1. Faucibus porta lacus fringilla vel
1. Aenean sit amet erat nunc
1. Eget porttitor lorem

 The rendered output looks like this:

  1. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet
  2. Consectetur adipiscing elit
  3. Integer molestie lorem at massa
  4. Facilisis in pretium nisl aliquet
  5. Nulla volutpat aliquam velit
  6. Faucibus porta lacus fringilla vel
  7. Aenean sit amet erat nunc
  8. Eget porttitor lorem
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Alex
: Web Developer
: Technophile

Mark
: SysAdmin
: Construction Worker

 The rendered output looks like this:

Alex
Web Developer
Technophile
Mark
SysAdmin
Construction Worker

Task lists allow you to create a list of items with checkboxes. To create a task list, add dashes (-) and brackets with a space ([ ]) before task list items. To select a checkbox, add an x in between the brackets ([x]).

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- [x] Write the press release
- [ ] Update the website
- [ ] Contact the media

 The rendered output looks like this:

  • Write the press release
  • Update the website
  • Contact the media

Wrap inline snippets of code with `.

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In this example, `<section></section>` should be wrapped as **code**.

 The rendered output looks like this:

In this example, <section></section> should be wrapped as code.

Or indent several lines of code by at least four spaces, as in:

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    // Some comments
    line 1 of code
    line 2 of code
    line 3 of code

 The rendered output looks like this:

// Some comments
line 1 of code
line 2 of code
line 3 of code

Use “fences” ``` to block in multiple lines of code with a language attribute.

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```markdown
Sample text here...
```

[GFM]^(GitHub Flavored Markdown) also supports syntax highlighting.

To activate it, simply add the file extension of the language you want to use directly after the first code “fence”, ```js, and syntax highlighting will automatically be applied in the rendered HTML.

For example, to apply syntax highlighting to JavaScript code:

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```js
grunt.initConfig({
  assemble: {
    options: {
      assets: 'docs/assets',
      data: 'src/data/*.{json,yml}',
      helpers: 'src/custom-helpers.js',
      partials: ['src/partials/**/*.{hbs,md}']
    },
    pages: {
      options: {
        layout: 'default.hbs'
      },
      files: {
        './': ['src/templates/pages/index.hbs']
      }
    }
  }
};
```

 The rendered output looks like this:

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grunt.initConfig({
  assemble: {
    options: {
      assets: 'docs/assets',
      data: 'src/data/*.{json,yml}',
      helpers: 'src/custom-helpers.js',
      partials: ['src/partials/**/*.{hbs,md}']
    },
    pages: {
      options: {
        layout: 'default.hbs'
      },
      files: {
        './': ['src/templates/pages/index.hbs']
      }
    }
  }
};
Note
Syntax highlighting page in Hugo Docs introduces more about syntax highlighting, including highlight shortcode.

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<https://foxdie.one>
<contact@abc.xyz>
[foxdie's domain](https://foxdie.one)

 The rendered output looks like this (hover over the link, there is no tooltip):

https://foxdie.one

[email protected]

foxdie’s domain

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[foxdie's domain](https://foxdie.one "Visit My Website!")

 The rendered output looks like this (hover over the link, there should be a tooltip):

foxdie’s domain

Named anchors enable you to jump to the specified anchor point on the same page. For example, each of these chapters:

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## Table of Contents
  * [Chapter 1](#chapter-1)
  * [Chapter 2](#chapter-2)
  * [Chapter 3](#chapter-3)

will jump to these sections:

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## Chapter 1 <a id="chapter-1"></a>
Content for chapter one.

## Chapter 2 <a id="chapter-2"></a>
Content for chapter one.

## Chapter 3 <a id="chapter-3"></a>
Content for chapter one.

Footnotes allow you to add notes and references without cluttering the body of the document. When you create a footnote, a superscript number with a link appears where you added the footnote reference. Readers can click the link to jump to the content of the footnote at the bottom of the page.

To create a footnote reference, add a caret and an identifier inside brackets ([^1]). Identifiers can be numbers or words, but they can’t contain spaces or tabs. Identifiers only correlate the footnote reference with the footnote itself — in the output, footnotes are numbered sequentially.

Add the footnote using another caret and number inside brackets with a colon and text ([^1]: My footnote.). You don’t have to put footnotes at the end of the document. You can put them anywhere except inside other elements like lists, block quotes, and tables.

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This is a digital footnote[^1].
This is a footnote with "label"[^label]

[^1]: This is a digital footnote
[^label]: This is a footnote with "label"

This is a digital footnote1.

This is a footnote with “label”2


Also see these posts for Table Test; Image Test and Emojis

Info
Not all Markdown features are supported by all themes. If you intend to rely on something from a third party, make sure that it supports all of the Markdown features you intend to use. This page, which includes all Markdown features, is a good example page to try when switching to another theme.


  1. http://learn.getgrav.org/content/markdown ↩︎

  2. Atishay Jain, Hugo in action Static sites and dynamic Jamstack apps, 2019. ↩︎